Jan 17, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

All Courses


 

Nursing

  
  •  

    NSG 4353 B.S.N. Leadership Capstone


    (3 hours)
    The capstone experience synthesizes the R.N. to B.S.N. nursing courses, previous degrees, and nursing experience to design, implement, and lead a project that will improve patient outcomes. Prerequisites: NSG 4112 NSG 4125 NSG 4235 NSG 4245 NSG 4416 , and NSG 4423 . Corequisite: NSG 4436 .
  
  •  

    NSG 4416 Quality Across Health Systems I


    (6 hours)
    The first of three practicum courses which require practical application of nursing knowledge and skills threaded across the R.N. to B.S.N. curriculum. Focus on advanced health assessment and professional role integration. Students will collaborate with a faculty member and participate in approved field experiences in health care organizations or community-based healthcare settings. Corequisites: NSG 4112  and NSG 4125 . Pass/fail.
  
  •  

    NSG 4423 Quality Across Health Systems II


    (3 hours)
    The second of three practicum courses which require practical application of nursing knowledge and skills threaded across the R.N. to B.S.N. curriculum. Focus on community health nursing and integration of healthcare research. Students will collaborate with a faculty member and participate in approved field experiences in health care organizations or community-based healthcare settings. Prerequisite: NSG 4416 . Corequisites: NSG 4245  and NSG 4235 . Pass/fail.
  
  •  

    NSG 4436 Quality Across Health Systems III


    (6 hours)
    The last of three practicum courses which require practical application of nursing knowledge and skills threaded across the R.N. to B.S.N. curriculum. Focus on leadership and management for the B.S.N. Students will collaborate with a faculty member and participate in approved field experiences in health care organizations or community-based healthcare settings. Prerequisites: NSG 4416  and NSG 4423 . Corequisite: NSG 4353 . Pass/fail.
  
  •  

    NSG 4903 Understanding Electrocardiography


    (3 hours)


    Physiologic/pathophysiologic processes of cardiac function. Includes laboratory and physical assessment data, EKG and rhythm strip analysis and incorporation of findings in decision-making for care of selected populations. Prerequisites: BIOL 2153 , BIOL 2151 , BIOL 2173 , and BIOL 2171  with grades of C or higher, and junior standing.

     


Petroleum Engineering

  
  •  

    PE 1001 Introduction to Petroleum Engineering


    (1 hour)
    Exposure to various disciplines within petroleum engineering including drilling, production, and reservoir engineering; contemporary issues in oil industry; professionalism and ethics in petroleum engineering.  No repeats allowed.
  
  •  

    PE 2101 Rock and Fluid Properties Lab


    (1 hour)
    Measurements of fluid dynamical and interfacial properties, determination of single and multiphase fluid flow properties of rocks, capillary pressure curves and relative permeabilities. Corequisites: PE 2113 , PE 2123 .
  
  •  

    PE 2113 Rock Properties


    (3 hours)
    Fundamental properties of petroleum reservoir rocks: porosity, permeability, electrical and mechanical properties. Properties of rock containing multiple fluid saturations: relative permeability and capillary pressure. Prerequisites: PE 1001 , GEOL 1014 , MATH 2073 , PHYS 2053  and PHYS 2051 . Corequisites: MATH 3073 , PE 2123 , and PHYS 2063 .
  
  •  

    PE 2123 Fluid Properties


    (3 hours)
    Phase behavior and PVT properties of dry, wet and retrograde condensate natural gases, as well as volatile and black oils; property estimation using correlations; flash and differential vaporization; introduction to gas-liquid equilibria; properties of oilfield water; gas hydrates and their prevention. Prerequisites: PE 1001 , CHEM 1013 , CHEM 1011 , and MATH 2073 . Corequisites: PE 2113  and MATH 3073 .
  
  •  

    PE 3003 Petroleum Economics and Property Evaluation


    (3 hours)
    Time value of money; profitability measures; engineering analysis and prediction of cash flows of oil and gas properties; revenues, discounts, depreciation, depletion, and risk analysis; contemporary economic issues affecting oil industry. Prerequisite: Junior standing, PE 2113 PE 2123 .
  
  •  

    PE 3013 Computer Applications in Petroleum Engineering


    (3 hours)
    Application of computers to solving various petroleum engineering problems. Use of EXCEL VBA programming methods to solve problems of interest to the petroleum industry, some of which require iterative solutions. Prerequisites: PE 2113 , PE 2123 . Corequisites: PE 3023 , ES 3003 .
  
  •  

    PE 3023 Reservoir Engineering I


    (3 hours)
    Volumetrics, determination of fluid contacts, gas reservoirs material balance, oil reservoirs material balance, diffusivity equation, inflow performance relationships, water influx, pressure transient analysis. Prerequisites: PE 2113 , PE 2123 , MATH 3073 .
  
  •  

    PE 3041 Drilling Lab


    (1 hour)
    Drilling Simulator Lab: Controls, operations, data acquisition, hydraulics, BOP and well control, rate of penetration vs. drill variables. Mud Lab: Measurements of drilling mud properties, mud additives, mud contaminants, mud liquid solids measurements. Prerequisite: PE 3043 .
  
  •  

    PE 3043 Drilling Engineering I


    (3 hours)
    Rotary drilling systems, drilling fluids, drilling fluids hydraulics, drill bit hydraulics, cuttings transport, solids control, well control mechanics, overview of well drilling planning. Prerequisites: ES 3003 , ES 3023 , MATH 3073 .
  
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    PE 3073 Production Engineering I


    (3 hours)
    Inflow performance relationships, single and multiphase flow in pipes, components of production system, basics of fluid separation and treatment, and analysis and optimization of production systems. Prerequisites: ES 3003  and PE 3023 .
  
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    PE 3323 Unconventional Resources


    (3 hours)
    Importance and significance of unconventional resources to oil and gas production; petrophysical characteristics of unconventional resources including TOC and fractures, and importance of core and log data; hydraulic fracturing in horizontal wells; well test analysis of fractured wells; rate-time analysis to calculate reserves. Prerequisite: PE 3023 .
  
  •  

    PE 3553 Practice of Petroleum Engineering


    (3 hours)
    Basic concepts of petroleum engineering for non-petroleum engineering students. Concepts in drilling, reservoir engineering, production engineering, formation evaluation and petroleum transactions. Prerequisite: EMGT 2013  with a grade of C or higher.
  
  •  

    PE 3711 Internship


    (1 hour)
    Training in an industrial setting on projects assigned by an industrial petroleum engineering organization, in consultation with the student’s academic advisor and the undergraduate coordinator.  Projects will be completed in a single semester. Pass-fail.
  
  •  

    PE 3733 Oil and Gas Metering and Instrumentation


    (3 hours)
    The most important aspects of measurement and instrumentation for the oil and gas industry: basic instrumentation concepts, temperature, pressure and flow rate measurements. Sampling, custody transfer, control and SCADA systems are also covered.
  
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    PE 4043 Drilling Engineering II


    (3 hours)
    Directional drilling mechanics, drill bit mechanics, drillstring mechanics, pore and fracture pressure predictions, drilling problems, well planning. Prerequisites:  PE 3043  and either PE 3013  or ES 2513 .
  
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    PE 4053 Formation Evaluation


    (3 hours)
    Theory of various well logging methods (electrical, acoustic, and radioactive). Log interpretation techniques for lithology and hydrocarbon identification and calculation of reservoir parameters (porosity and saturation). Prerequisites: GEOL 3153 ; PE 2113 , PE 2123 .
  
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    PE 4063 Well Construction and Completion Design


    (3 hours)
    Casing program, casing and tubing design, principles of cementing, completion added skin, well perforating, hydraulic fracturing, sand control and acidizing. Prerequisites: PE 3013  or ES 2513  , PE 3023 , PE 3043 .
  
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    PE 4071 Production Engineering Lab


    (1 hour)
    Experiments on metering, multiphase flow in pipes and separation. Prerequisite: PE 3073 .
  
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    PE 4073 Production Engineering II


    (3 hours)
    Overview and application of common methods for artificially lifting oil wells, dewatering gas wells and boosting deepwater production; detailed theory, design and troubleshooting of the important artificial lift methods, including continuous gas lift, beam pumping, electrical submersible pumping and progressing cavity pumps. Prerequisites:  PE 3073  and either PE 3013  or ES 2513 .
  
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    PE 4113 Reservoir Engineering II


    (3 hours)
    Water flooding performance predictions for linear, 2D and layered systems with analytical methods and numerical reservoir simulation. Basics of tertiary recovery processes. Prerequisites: PE 3023  and either PE 3013  or ES 2513 .
  
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    PE 4183 Flow Assurance


    (3 hours)
    Multi-disciplinary subject addressing hydrocarbon production from offshore fields, including design and operational issues. Major subjects to be covered include the prediction of paraffin deposition, hydrates, and remedial actions. Prerequisites: ES 3073 , PE 3073  and either PE 3013  or ES 2513  .
  
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    PE 4513 Integrated Reservoir Modeling


    (3 hours)
    Tools used for integrating geophysical, geological and engineering data in reservoir modeling. Geostatistical principles including kriging and simulation. Upscaling and ranking, forward simulations, uncertainty analysis. Prerequisite: PE 3023 .
  
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    PE 4643 Directional and Horizontal Drilling


    (3 hours)
    Well trajectory design (2D and 3D), mechanics and design of bottom hole assemblies, down hole motors, orientation of deflection tools, well trajectory calculations based on survey data, down-hole friction management -rag and torque calculations in 2D and 3D wells, buckling and maximum permissible doglegs. Prerequisite: PE 3043 
  
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    PE 4663 Well Stimulation


    (3 hours)
    Origin and modeling of formation damage, hydraulic fracturing (vertical and horizontal fractures), modeling, design and production performance evaluation, acid reactions with reservoir minerals, sandstone matrix acidizing, acidizing of carbonates, acid additives. Prerequisite: PE 3023.
  
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    PE 4863 Special Topics in Petroleum Engineering


    (3 hours)
    Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.
  
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    PE 4871-3 Research in Petroleum Engineering


    (1-3 hours)
    Individual and/or group study of selected problems. Oral and written reports may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PE 4983 Capstone Design


    (3 hours)
    Student teams apply knowledge in the areas of geology, reservoir engineering, production, drilling and well completions to practical design problems based on real field data with all of the associated shortcomings and uncertainties. Preparation of oral and written technical presentations that propose economically feasible and environmentally sound strategies of optimizing the production and/or operating conditions for the given data set. Corequisites: PE 3041 , PE 4043 , PE 4053 , PE 4063 PE 4071 , PE 4073 , PE 4113 , PE 4513 , and either PE 3323  or PE 4183 .
  
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    PE 4991-3 Independent Study


    (1-3 hours)
    Independent or group studies on special topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 1003 Socrates to Sartre: Ideas that Shaped our World


    (3 hours) Block Two
    Major ideas, figures, and movements in philosophy that have shaped Western thought and heritage from the beginnings of Greek thought to the present, including the broad historical and cultural context in which these ideas emerged.
  
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    PHIL 1033 Philosophy and Literature


    (3 hours) Block One
    An exploration of the philosophical significance of major works of literature.
  
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    PHIL 1063 Ethics and the Problems of Society


    (3 hours Block Two
    Major theories of ethics that have shaped Western thought and social institutions. Utilitarianism, natural rights, rational principles of conduct, and other sources of ethical justification are explored by addressing their implications for such current issues as abortion, sexual conduct, minority rights, and pornography.
  
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    PHIL 1123 Philosophy and Film


    (3 hours) Block One
    Film is the democratic art form par excellence. From this point of view, we study revenge, honor, rivalry, jealousy, betrayal, love, sacrifice, heroism, conformism, fear, and social cowardice, as these are reflected in classic films such as High Noon and The Godfather. Same as FLM 1123 .
  
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    PHIL 1453 The Great Conversation I: Ancient and Medieval


    (3 hours) Block Two
    Introduction to ancient and medieval thought about the origins of the cosmos and human life, the nature of God (or the gods), the relationship between human and divine spheres, and the foundations and limits of knowledge. Same as REL 1453 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 2013 Reasoning


    (3 hours) Block One
    The development of reasoning skills as used in reading critically, writing, and thinking about practical or theoretical issues. Emphasis on how to analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments. Especially recommended for prelaw students.
  
  •  

    PHIL 2083 Western Political Thought I: From the Greek Polis to the Modern State


    (3 hours) Block Two
    The political theory of pagan antiquity in Greece and Rome, focusing on Plato and Aristotle, along with other writers. Attention to the role of Christianity in the evolution of Western political ideas. Same as POL 2083 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 2093 Western Political Thought II: From the English Revolution to the Russian Revolution


    (3 hours) Block Two
    How Western modernity arose in 16th-19th centuries. Pursues changes in the idea of the individual and the political community from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment and from the era of democratic revolutions to the rise of industrial societies. Same as POL 2093 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 2113 Philosophy of Art


    (3 hours) Block One
    An examination of paintings, sculpture, literature, film, and music, in order to explore philosophical questions about the nature of art: Is beauty real? Is it definable? Can it be judged objectively? Is it subject to moral or political standards?
  
  •  

    PHIL 2183 Current Problems in Political and Social Philosophy


    (3 hours)
    Selected topics in political and social philosophy, including the concept of justice, the status of political rights, and the justification of social, economic, and legal institutions.
  
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    PHIL 2233 Existentialism in the 20th Century


    (3 hours) Block Two
    Existential thought and related philosophies of the 20th century, including their influence on modern psychology, theology, and the arts.
  
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    PHIL 2453 The Great Conversation II: Modern and Contemporary


    (3 hours) Block Two
    An examination of major figures in the break-off of philosophy from theology in the modern era. Consideration of the Reformation background of modern thought, the challenge of scientific rationalism to religion, and the effort to conceive the moral and political foundations of society in wholly secular terms. Same as REL 2453 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 3013 Modern Philosophy


    (3 hours)
    Works by major Continental and British philosophers from the 16th through the 18th centuries, including the influence of skepticism and the rise of modern science.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3023 History of Ethics


    (3 hours)
    The development of ethical reasoning from Plato to the present, with emphasis on problems of justifying moral judgments and understanding the meaning of ethical terms.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3043 Ancient Philosophy


    (3 hours)
    The beginnings of philosophical thought in the West.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3053 Philosophy of Science


    (3 hours)
    Methods, aims, and foundations of science, including the nature of scientific explanation, laws, and theories; the alleged objectivity of scientific theory-testing and theory-choice; and the structure of scientific revolutions. Attention to revolutionary episodes in the history of science.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3073 Metaphysics


    (3 hours)
    Fundamental principles of such subjects as being, substance, essence, self, time, space, and the nature of reality. Course will focus on the work of a single thinker.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3163 Continental European Philosophy


    (3 hours)
    Introduction to 20th-century continental European philosophy with emphasis on the philosophy of Heidegger.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3173 Major Philosophical Figures


    (3 hours)
    An in-depth look at a major figure in philosophy. Some consideration given to major and competing trends in the interpretation of this philosopher. Emphasis on how the thinker puts parts into a whole. Philosopher chosen and instructor will vary from semester to semester.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3183 The Tradition of Existentialism


    (3 hours)
    Historical survey of writings in the existentialist tradition, engaging in phenomenological analysis of the human condition. Such concepts and issues as freedom of will, alienation, bad faith, and responsibility are addressed.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3193 Philosophy, Politics and Economics


    (3 hours)
    Non-technical, historical survey of major economic theories from Adam Smith to the present (Mercantilism, Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, J.S. Mill, Fourier, Marx, Mises, Hayek, Keynes, Friedman, etc.) to show how those economic views reflect philosophical presuppositions and how they both reflect political contexts and shape future contexts.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3213 Philosophical Anthropology


    (3 hours)
    An exploration of ancient, modern, religious, and philosophical answers to the question, “What is Man?” An examination of how it sets apart “Athens” and “Jerusalem” as very different approaches to the question; of modern efforts to make anthropology the heart of philosophy; of the influential critique of humanism in Heidegger and the poststructuralists and of recent responses to that.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3223 Nietzsche and Socrates


    (3 hours)
    An exploration of ancient and modern interpretations of the philosopher Socrates, with special emphasis on the thought of Nietzsche. A consideration of the quarrel between philosophy and poetry, the nature of philosophical eros, the “decadence” of philosophy and philosophical rhetoric.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3243 Liberalism and Democracy


    (3 hours)
    The evolution of liberal political philosophy in the 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on the tension between liberty and equality in economic and political life. Same as POL 3143 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 3263 Religion and Morality from Kant to Nietzsche


    (3 hours)
    Major themes and figures in 18th- and 19thcentury moral philosophy and theology, with attention to the Enlightenment’s effort to make secular sense of the moral world and to critics of this effort, both secular and theological. Same as REL 3263 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 3283 Topics in Philosophy and Religion


    (3 hours)
    A consideration of religious themes in philosophy and philosophical questions in religious thought and practice. Same as REL 3283 .
  
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    PHIL 3293 Jewish Thinkers of the Twentieth Century


    (3 hours)
    An in-depth study of one or more major Jewish writers of the last century who have had an enduring impact on modern thought or culture, such as Hannah Arendt, Sigmund Freud, Franz Kafka, Walter Benjamin, Gershom Scholem, Franz Rosensweig, Emmanuel Levinas and others.
  
  •  

    PHIL 3323 Reason, Romance and the Rise of Modernity


    (3 hours)
    An examination of Christian thought from the 17th through the 19th centuries. Discussion will include the movements that arise out of the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and the emerging sciences on Christian views of: God, Jesus Christ, the human soul, the bible, ethics, and the church. Same as REL 3323 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 3993 Independent Study


    (3 hours)
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PHIL 4003 Seminar in the History of Political Thought


    (3 hours)
    Seminar on a single author, the political thought of a particular time and place, or a theme or school of thought. For seniors majoring in history, political science, or philosophy, or pursuing a certificate in political philosophy. Also open to underclass students who are exceptionally able or well-prepared. Same as HIST 4033 /POL 4033 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4023 Philosophical Theology


    (3 hours)
    The theological character of certain aspects of contemporary philosophy and the philosophical significance of certain modern theological proposals. Same as REL 4023 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4053 Aesthetics


    (3 hours)
    In-depth study of one or more major figures in the philosophy of art, such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Sartre, or Heidegger.
  
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    PHIL 4063 Philosophy of Law


    (3 hours)
    Major alternative theories of the nature of law and legal systems and possible synthesis, with emphasis on selected principal writings of such philosophers as Hart, Kelsen, R.M. Dworkin, Ross, Fuller, and Raz. Topics include the nature of norms, the relation between law and morality studies, and issues in theory of adjudication. Same as POL 4063 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4073 Phenomenology


    (3 hours)
    Examination of the most important movement in European philosophy in the twentieth century which spawned Sartre’s existentialism, Heidegger’s ontology, hermeneutics, and post-structuralism. Attention to its consequences for history and historical science, anthropology, psychology, cultural studies, and methods of analysis and interpretation.
  
  •  

    PHIL 4143 Studies in Plato and Aristotle


    (3 hours)
    Seminal Platonic dialogues or Aristotelian treatises, with attention to the established arena of public discourse within which philosophy competed for the prize of wisdom. Supplementary reading may include sections from Ancient Greek poetry, drama, and history.
  
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    PHIL 4163 Philosophy of Natural Law and Natural Right


    (3 hours)
    An introduction to the Western natural law tradition. The course is grounded in a study of Thomas Aquinas on natural law, and proceeds to examine discussions by Hobbes, Locke, Kant, Fuller, and Hart. Same as REL 4163 /LAWU 4163 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4233 Seminar in the History of Educational Thought


    (3 hours)
    Seminar on a single author, the educational thought of a particular time and place, or a theme of school of thought. For juniors or seniors minoring in education and majoring or minoring in philosophy.  Also open to underclass students of any major who are exceptionally able or well-prepared. Same as EDUC 4233 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4243 Augustine


    (3 hours)
    An introduction to the theology of Augustine of Hippo, with special attention to his moral nd political writings. Same as REL 4043 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4253 Text and Meaning


    (3 hours)
    Interdisciplinary course on hermeneutics that examines how texts, contexts, and language communicate claims of meaning, value, and beauty. We will examine these issues through examples in art, religion, law, music, and literature. Same as REL 4253 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4263 Kant and German Idealism


    (3 hours)
    Kant’s “Copernican Revolution” in philosophy - the “Critique of Reason” - as it applies to science, nature, ethics, theology, politics, aesthetic and history, and its impact on German Romanticism, Idealism, and later movements like Marxism and Existentialism.
  
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    PHIL 4333 Jewish Philosophy and Revelation: Ancient and Medieval Approaches


    (3 hours)
    An exploration of philosophical reflection on the Hebrew scriptures in the ancient and medieval periods, with emphasis on the rabbis of the Talmud and Maimonides. Same as REL 4333 .
  
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    PHIL 4453 Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche


    (3 hours)
    Development of 19th-century German philosophy including the problem of the nature and significance of history. Emphasis on Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche, with additional readings from Fichte, Feuerbach, and Schopenhauer. Same as HIST 4453 .
  
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    PHIL 4543 Philosophy of Religion


    (3 hours)
    Analysis of various religious stances and positions to understand the philosophical assumptions involved. Same as REL 4543 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4603 Kierkegaard


    (3 hours)
    Close study of the major pseudonymous works of Kierkegaard, with special attention to “aesthetic,” “ethical,” and “religious” modes of life, the nature of paradox, love, anxiety, despair, faith, “the moment,” and grace. Same as REL 4603 .
  
  •  

    PHIL 4863 Special Topics


    (3 hours)
  
  •  

    PHIL 4973 Senior Project


    (3 hours)
  
  •  

    PHIL 4993 Independent Study


    (3 hours)
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Physics

  
  •  

    PHYS 1001 The World of Physics


    (1 hour)
    An introduction to the profession, culture, and discipline of physics. Primarily for those intending, or considering, a career in physics or engineering physics.
  
  •  

    PHYS 1003 Liberal Art of Physics


    (3 hours) Block Three
    Selected ideas drawn from classical and modern (relativity and quantum) physics and astronomy that have most influenced human history, culture, and economy, including the historical and cultural context in which the ideas developed. Emphasis on concepts common to all physical sciences. Not intended for premedical students.
  
  •  

    PHYS 1011 Introductory Physics I Laboratory


    (1 hour)
    Laboratory experiments designed to complement the topics covered in PHYS 1013 . Non-calculus based. Corequisite: PHYS 1013 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 1013 Introductory Physics I


    (3 hours) Block Three
    An introduction to natural phenomena and their description using algebra-based mathematical models. Emphasis on general problem-solving techniques and the development of critical thinking skills. Forces, motion, energy, momentum, fluids, and waves. Primarily for students not majoring in engineering or physical sciences. Primarily for students not majoring in engineering or physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1163  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 1021 Introductory Physics II Laboratory


    (1 hour)
    Laboratory experiments designed to complement the topics covered in PHYS 1023 . Corequisite: PHYS 1023 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 1023 Introductory Physics II


    (3 hours)
    A continuation of PHYS 1013 . Topics include electricity, magnetism, electric circuits, optics, relativity, quantum phenomena, radioactivity, and particle physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1013 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 1093 Astronomy


    (3 hours) Block Three
    Astronomy from the earth to the limits of the observable universe. Includes the history of astronomy and how the scientific method came to be applied to it; the laws of physics and how they apply to astronomy; descriptions of celestial objects; and scientific theories of the origin, and scientific theories of the origin, evolution, and operation of the universe.
  
  •  

    PHYS 2051 General Physics I Laboratory


    (1 hour)
    Experiments in mechanics and wave motion designed to complement the topics covered in PHYS 2053 . Corequisite: PHYS 2053 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 2053 General Physics I


    (3 hours)


    A calculus-based introduction to the classical laws of nature describing forces, motion, energy and momentum, and their applications. Includes Newton’s laws and conservation laws for energy and momentum with applications to elasticity, oscillations, waves, fluids and gravity. Primarily for science and engineering students. Prerequisite: MATH 2014 .

     

  
  •  

    PHYS 2061 General Physics II Laboratory


    (1 hour)
    Experiments in magnetism, electricity, and light designed to complement the topics covered in PHYS 2063 . Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 2063 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 2063 General Physics II


    (3 hours)
    A calculus-based introduction to the classical laws of nature describing electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic induction, and their applications. Includes Maxwell’s laws with applications to circuits, electromagnetic waves, and geometric and physical optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 2053  and MATH 2024 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 2071 General Physics III Laboratory


    (1 hour)
    Experiments in introductory relativity, quantum mechanics and nuclear physics. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 2073 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 2073 General Physics III


    (3 hours)
    Introduction to the theories and applications of atomic, nuclear, quantum, relativistic, and solid state physics with applications. Prerequisite: PHYS 2063 . Corequisite: MATH 2073  or MATH 3073 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 3043 Statistical and Thermal Physics


    (3 hours)
    Classical and statistical descriptions of thermodynamics. Essentials of probability and statistics, kinetic theory of gasses, statistical mechanics, temperature, equations of state, heat, internal energy, entropy, reversibility and distribution functions. Prerequisites: PHYS 2073  and MATH 3073 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 3053 Methods of Mathematical Physics in Physical Sciences


    (3 hours)
    Broad introduction to analytical techniques used in upper-level physics courses. Various approaches to problems in optics and waves, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics will be covered. Prerequisites: PHYS 2073  and MATH 3073 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PHYS 3072 Senior Physics Laboratory


    (2 hours)
    A senior level course in experimental physics with experiments in optics, interferometry, atomic and laser physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 2073 , PHYS 2071 , PHYS 3112 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 3112 Physics Instrumentation Laboratory


    (2 hours)
    Project and design in engineering physics. Stresses use of discrete and integrated circuitry in both digital and analog signal acquisition and processing. Construction of a project is included. Prerequisites for B.S. in physics and engineering physics: EE 2003 , EE 2001 . Recommended prerequisites for B.A. in Physics: EE 2003 , EE 2001 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 3122 Instrumentation Methods Laboratory


    (2 hours)
    Project and design for data acquisition, analysis, and control systems. Stresses design, evaluation, calibration, troubleshooting, and application of electronic instrumentation incorporating appropriate engineering standards and realistic constraints. Design projects include microcontroller programming for measurement systems, sensors, and actuators. Professional ethics questions are discussed. Prerequisite: PHYS 3112 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 3133 Introduction to Musical Acoustics


    (3 hours)
    The physics of vibrating acoustic components such as strings, bars, membranes and plates, coupled acoustic systems, propagation of sound in air (including radiation, transmission, absorption, and diffraction), and the production and reception of musical sounds. Prerequisite: PHYS 2053 . Corequisite: MATH 3073  or PHYS 3053 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 4003 Classical Mechanics


    (3 hours)
    Newtonian mechanics; harmonic, damped, and driven damped oscillators; resonance; variational calculus; Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics; central force motion; collisions; rigid body dynamics; coupled oscillators; vibrating strings; noninertial frames. Prerequisites: PHYS 3053 , MATH 3073 .
 

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